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Credits
  • Director: Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth
  • Producer: Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth
  • Screenwriters: Maartje Seyferth
  • Cast: Ali Sultan, Elvira Out, Gürkan Küçüksentürk, Hugo Metsers, Jasper van Beusekom, Kitty Courbois, Nellie Benner, Titus Muizelaar
  • Cinematography: Victor Nieuwenhuijs
Product Details
  • Format: DVD, Blu-ray
  • Catalog: ART49
  • UPC: DVD: 851597006346 -- Blu-ray: 851597006353
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Country: Netherlands
  • Language: Dutch
  • Rating: Not rated
  • Year: 2010
  • Length: 85
  • Aspect ratio: 1.78: 1
Gallery
This surreal erotic thriller is set in a flesh-filled and violence-prone butcher shop. A large, lustful butcher, used to living out his sexual fantasies in the shop, becomes interested in Roxy, his young female apprentice. The girl, documenting everything with a video camera, enthusiastically gets involved with him. But when the butcher is murdered and a police inspector, who looks exactly like the dead butcher, investigates the crime, the story takes a dreamlike spin. A visually explicit, beguiling tale - think Peter Greenaway’s The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover, meets Gaspar Noé's Carne by way of Jean-Pierre Jeunet's Delicatessen.
Reviews

“Everything about this movie is dark and bleak, and surreal, but it’s still pretty great to look at. There are lots of artsy, almost hallucinogenic shots to follow….I should mention that there is a lot of urinating in this film. Again, I think the filmmakers were going more for an artsy flick than a more serious film, and that’s a shame since the cinematography is so mesmerizing. I found myself asking, is the detective really the butcher? Is the butcher the detective? Is the butcher really dead? What does it all mean?” – HorrorNews

 

“For those who prefer cerebral arthouse horror, MEAT is a pallid-colored puzzle box that deserves a decent after-movie discussion and possibly even a repeat viewing. Decidedly European in its approach, it is a twisty, sexually-charged character piece. The film takes its time, doesn’t overexplain, and revels in silent moments.
Directors Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth allow their actors to inhabit long takes, developing complex characters through subtle, exacting performances. The scenes play out with a quiet authenticity, unencumbered by edits. The result is phenomenal, naturalistic work from the entire cast, but particularly haunting performances by Titus Muizelaar and Nellie Benner as the leads. The film, written by Seyferth, sits in the muck and meditates on the stickier aspects of sexuality and death, including cruelty, lust, perversion, rape, consent, suicide, and murder. 3 out of 4 stars – TheClevelandMovieBlog

“Comes across as something like a very, very Dutch Donnie Darko on one thousandth of the budget and with an unrepentant sociopath for a writer.” – Alln Lear, TheSlaughteredBird

“I have to be honest: I’ve never been a fan of experimental films. I’ve only seen a handful, but I did not enjoy any of them. As such, I’m having a hard time deciphering my feelings about MEAT, a recent release from Artsploitation Films. While not solidly experimental in classification, the movie has many of the traits associated with these kind of films. If I’m basing my review on entertainment value alone, I suppose I’d have to say it’s decent, but not fantastic; it kept my attention, but only because I was struggling to figure out what was happening and why. In the end, I guess I have to say watch this one for yourself and draw your own conclusion as to whether or not it merits accolades. From a production standpoint, MEAT looks pretty good. The sets are great, the acting is very good, and the attention to detail is superb. The cinematography is interesting, and has some great and unusual camera angles. And there’s a nice dose of absurdity to the events that unfold (I particularly enjoyed how everybody was using the meat locker as a hook-up spot for sex). Perhaps I need to watch the film again…maybe I missed something the first time around. I don’t know. But for now I’ll just say it is an ok movie. I will probably revisit it again soon, but I don’t know for sure.” – ShatteredRavings

Meat is a very weird film… up to the halfway mark there is at least some cohesiveness to the plot, but then all semblance of normality is abandoned and the rest of the movie is some sort of nightmare dreamscape where what is reality and what isn’t is very questionable. Along with all this weirdness we also get plenty of explicit nudity, both various scenes of full frontal male and female nudity, a couple of awkward sex scenes, even a couple of possibly rape scenes…This is less a horror, and more kind of a surreal thriller.” – TheRottingZombie

“A stylistic crime thriller that manages to capture the atmosphere of films such as Calvaire (2004), with the disjointed storytelling and intriguing mystery of Giuseppe Tornatore’s A Pure Formality (1994). To put it in simple terms, Meat is a dish that you’ll want sit down and consume more than once. If one were to properly describe this film, the phrase ‘beauty found within the confines of perversion’ is the first thing that comes to mind. However, that’s only telling a fraction of the story; Meat is engulfed with a macabre atmosphere, almost completely devoid of a soundtrack–ensuring the imagery and mood of every single passing moment isn’t lost on the viewer. It’s a bleak look at the droning pace of existence, the objectification of human beings, and the vile nature sexual obsession. This is a mystery that fuses erotica, futility, and deviation into a vehicle that surpasses normal expectations with other genre entries. It’s bleak, beautiful, and not something you’ll soon forget after watching. – ThatsNotCurrent

“Imagine David Lynch walked into a butcher shop and decided to make a film about it; the result would likely be quite similar to Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth’s Meat. Artsploitation has a knack for releasing films that push the boundaries of genre and taste. Many of their films also present far more questions than answers, and with the release of Meat, they more than live up to their reputation….a darkly comic film that confronts the viewer with its presentation of the human experience as one of cold detachment, where pleasure is king and innocence is preyed upon. ” – CinemaBluster

“Meat is a powerful transcending film seismically barreling through a Lynchian structure…Graphically infrasexual and skewed beyond simplicity, Meat’s refreshingly loaded with unpleasantries and basted moistly with an outer layer of perversion that drips into an oven of thriller surreality. Meat is a phenomenal film that’s well-aged and ready to be rubbed, tenderized, devoured in all senses of the meaning” – ItsBlogginEvil

“This isn’t a horror film precisely. It’s more of a psychological thriller but on LSD. Maybe it would be more accurate to call it a psychedelic thriller; some of the images resemble an acid trip and truly they speak for themselves. There isn’t a lot of dialogue here (a previous film by Seyferth had none at all) and indeed Roxy doesn’t speak until nearly halfway through the film. That doesn’t mean there isn’t a lot going on though.

There is an awful lot of naked flesh here, both of the human and slaughterhouse varieties…We see a lot of very graphic sex, almost to the point of pornography which may make some sensitive prudes more than a little squeamish….This Meat is rather highly seasoned and spicy, but for those of that particular palate, this is a dish best consumed quickly.” – Cinema365

“The exotically disturbing character-driven Dutch drama Meat (a.k.a. Vlees) is most definitely not your old-fashioned grandmother’s tenderloin steak of a sexual psychological thriller. Filmmakers Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth literally and figuratively leads the wide-eyed lamb to the slaughter in this twisted, titillating tale of emotional detachment yet thirsty urgency for forceful flesh and bone in this tawdry crime caper from The Netherlands. Convincingly hypnotic, colorfully decadent and unapologetic in its branded rawness, Meat is a bizarre and bold commentary on the reckless human carnal compulsion layered underneath mental coldness and despair. Skillfully, the aptly titled film is a potent and functional metaphor for the lost and wayward souls (both human and the victimized animals as edible sacrifices) that are numb and chopped up to the point of no return…Meat is lustfully subversive and rooted in misplaced sensuality where inner spirit and integrity are replaced with provocative urges to pound the available flesh with aimless abandonment.

Sure, there are elements of confusion to be found in Meat but the risqué performances, the frank examination of sexual release as a sociological and psychological necessity for falsified liberation and expression, and the butcher shop as the creative placement and interpretation for discarded body parts ripped to assorted pieces sexually and otherwise brilliantly culminates in a flexible and feisty film noir that resonates with acidic truthfulness in chronicled alienation.” – TheCriticalCritics

“When Roxy (Nellie Benner) gets a job at a local butcher’s shop her life gets turned upside down in the dramatic thriller Meat (2010). Boobs, bush, and butt are regularly on display as Nellie holds nothing back.” – MrSkin

“A sleazy Dutch thriller…Carnal, crazy, intense, and—like the rest of Artsploitation Films’ catalog—Meat is absolutely bizarre.” – Jason Thorson, RavenousMonster 

Meat is a movie but it is also raw, confrontational guerilla theatre. It deals in abstracts rather than talking about characters who are instantly recognizable as real people performed by a talented cast who have to live with the choices that they make. It is very possible that viewers will see some of their own desires and frustrations here. The film does not resolves any of the questions it raises and this is not a film for anyone who easily tires of ambiguities. The film has high art shock aesthetics and some memorable imagery and lines of inquiry… “[A] bizarre, chilling little character drama…This is not a slasher flick or erotic thriller, but this an art house story that is told through oblique camera angles, stilted two-handers consisting of little more than elliptic dialogue, blunt-force symbolism and explicit sexual come-ons. People rarely interact like normal human beings would, or do anything that ties them to the real world…The coldly explicit visuals are rough, filthy and graceful.” – ReviewsbyAmosLassen

“Artsploitation Films has just pulled a Dutch film called Meat (aka Vlees, 2010) out of the freezer, and it’s kind of a doozy…Meat is a nonlinear murder mystery that starts out as day-in-the-life middle-aged sexual intrigue, morphs briefly into one of those young-people-and-discotheques Euroflicks, and finally turns into a post-modern police procedural. It’s not much of a whodunit, but it’s a pretty good example of a 21st-century grindhouse film, serving up pungent elements of low-budget horror and surrealism with erotic aromatics and a permeating abattoir stench. But I don’t want to oversell it. Just think Luis Buñuel crossed with Jörg Buttgereit.” – DeepFocus

“There is no question that this is a weird one…Meat is an orphan that needs your love.” – 366WeirdMovies

Bizarre, chilling… a haunting, unsettling piece of work. If you want a gruesome, disturbing yet oddly meditative little tone poem to get you thinking, consider Meat.” – Screen Anarchy

“A stunningly rich study of sex and death, pleasure and pain, fantasy and reality – as well as one of the most imaginative damnations of the animal industry you’ll ever experience… Meat certainly has its freezer full of dastardly delmonicos caught in their own obsessions of passive-aggressive sexual dominance and guilt. Meat is raw. Meat is sex. Meat is satire. Meat your makers. Meat is acting. Meat is lean and mean.” Quiet Earth

“Surreal Dutch neo-noir …The narrative unfolds with the logic of a dream, drifting wantonly and waywardly into abrupt changes of time, pace and style. A carnal film, both literally and viscerally, with its heart not so much on its sleeve, as on its plate. “ Electric Sheep Magazine

Screenings
2010 - Rotterdam Film Festival
2010 - Sitges Film Festival
2011 - Paris L'Etrange Festival
2011 - New York International Film Festival
2010 - Netherlands Film Festival
2011 - St. Petersburg Film Festival
About the Director

VICTOR NIEUWENHUIJS (Born: 1944, The Netherlands) studied politics at the University of Amsterdam, attended Painting and Photography at the Academy Ateliers ’63 in Haarlem and Film at the Free Academy in Amsterdam. Since 1984 he is active as a film maker, together with Maartje Seyferth. In 1986 Nieuwenhuijs and Seyferth founded the production company Moskito Film. Their films are now in the collection of the Dutch Film Museum in Amsterdam.

MAARTJE SEYFERTH (Born: 1945, Amsterdam) She is a director and writer, known for Meat (2010),Venus in Furs (1994) and Lulu (2005). She is married to Victor Nieuwenhuijs.

Films Co-directed by Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth:

2015: Cat and Mouse

2010:  Meat

2009: Crepuscule

2005: Lulu

1994: Venus in Furs

 

 

 

Buy DVD
Watch on Demand
Credits
  • Director: Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth
  • Producer: Victor Nieuwenhuijs and Maartje Seyferth
  • Screenwriters: Maartje Seyferth
  • Cast: Ali Sultan, Elvira Out, Gürkan Küçüksentürk, Hugo Metsers, Jasper van Beusekom, Kitty Courbois, Nellie Benner, Titus Muizelaar
  • Cinematography: Victor Nieuwenhuijs
Product Details
  • Format: DVD, Blu-ray
  • Catalog: ART49
  • UPC: DVD: 851597006346 -- Blu-ray: 851597006353
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Country: Netherlands
  • Language: Dutch
  • Rating: Not rated
  • Year: 2010
  • Length: 85
  • Aspect ratio: 1.78: 1
Gallery